Dr John Watts

BSc, MB BCh, LLM, Dip Pharm Med, MRCPsych

Child and adolescent psychiatrist

Dr John Watts is a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist at the Kent and Medway Adolescent Unit.

Other roles

Dr Watts is a member of the Royal College of Psychiatrists (MRCPsych) and was previously a member of the faculty of pharmaceutical physicians, part of the Royal College of Physicians. He is also a Medical Member of the Mental Health Tribunal Service.

Background

Dr Watts completed his medical training at the University of Wales College Of Medicine, his psychiatric training at St George’s Hospital Medical School and specialist training in child and adolescent psychiatry at Kent and Guy’s Hospital, London.

He has worked as a consultant in community child and adolescent mental health services, and since 2011, has been working on inpatient CAMHS wards.

Research

His current research interests include psychopharmacology and legal and ethical issues relating to psychiatric treatment, including issues of capacity, consent, autonomy and confidentiality. He has also taken part in studies on medication for hyperkinetic disorder in children with special educational needs, smoking cessation, depression, anxiety disorders and dementia.

During his career, he has been involved in researching medications for depression, schizophrenia, anxiety, drug addiction and hyperkinetic disorder, and more recently he has taken on medical law.

Publications

Watts J (2017). Correspondence: Being sensible about suicides. BJPsych Bulletin 41 (4). 237.

Watts J (2016). Correspondence: Prescribing sodium oxybate for narcolepsy: end the postcode lottery and apply some common sense. BMJ 353: 364.

Watts J (2016). Correspondence: Detention of children is needed at times. BJPsych Bulletin 40 (2). 106.

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2015). Capacity to consent to sex reframed: IM, TZ (no 2), the need for an evidence-based model of sexual decision-making and socio-sexual competence. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 40. 50-59.

Stefikova M and Watts J. (2015). Initial family meetings on the Kent and Medway Adolescent Unit Wards. The Online Journal Of Clinical Audits, 7(2). Retrieved May 19, 2015, from http://www.clinicalaudits.com/index.php/ojca/article/view/435

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2014) Is childhood a disability? Using Mental Capacity Tribunals and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards to shield children’s capacity to consent to and refuse medical treatment. Tizard Learning Disability Review 19 (2) 96-106.

Watts J and Mackenzie R (2014) The Mental Health Act versus the Mental Capacity Act. Is the MHA losing its edge? Tizard Learning Disability Review 19 (1) 29-34. Winner of the 2015 Highly Commended Paper Award, Emerald Publishing Group.

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2013) Sexual health, neurodiversity and capacity to consent to sex Tizard Learning Disability Review 18 (2) 88 – 97.

Watts J and Mackenzie J (2013) The Zone of Parental Control: a reasonable idea or an unusable concept? Tizard Learning Disability Review 18 (1) 38 – 44.

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2012) Does lack of a moral feeling brain indicate moral disability: children diagnosed with callous unemotional traits, emotion regulation and the potential of treatment with Oxytocin. Tizard Learning Disability Review 17 (4) 184 – 193.

Watts J and Mackenzie R (2012) Exposing secrets: mental health tribunals held in public. An “ongoing media circus” or justified transparency. Tizard Learning Disability Review 17 (3) 144-150.

Mackenzie R, Watts J and Howe L (2012) Supporting aspirations – or not? Recent reforms on equality, the green paper on Special Educational Needs and the potential of a neurodiversity spectrum statement. Tizard Learning Disability Review 17 (1) 36-48.

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2011) Robots, social networking sites and multi-user games: using new and existing assistive technologies to promote human flourishing. Tizard Learning Disability Review 16 (5) (in press).

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2011) Including Emotionality in Tests of Competence: How Does Neurodiversity Affect Measures of Free Will and Agency in Medical Decision Making? American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 2 (3) 27-36.

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2011) Can clinicians and carers make valid decisions about others’ decision-making capacities unless tests of decision-making competence and capacity include emotionality and neurodiversity? Tizard Learning Disability Review 16 (3) 43-51.

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2011) Is our legal, health care and social support infrastructure neurodiverse enough? How far are the aims of the neurodiversity movement fulfilled for those diagnosed with cognitive disability and learning disability? Tizard Learning Disability Review 16 (1):  30-37.

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2010) Missing a beat: police responses to people with learning disabilities and mental health problems. Tizard Learning Disability Review 15 (4):  34-40.

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2010) The reform of the law governing the social care of adults in England and Wales. Tizard Learning Disability Review 15 (3):  46-52.

Soppitt R, Watts J and Fuller A (2010) Drug Treatment for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The Online Journal of Clinical Audits. 2(2): 62-66.

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2010) Injustice and disabilities: the case against the extradition of Gary McKinnon to the USA. Tizard Learning Disability Review 15 (2):  45-51.

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2010) Mind the gap: the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards in the amended Mental Capacity Act 2005. Tizard Learning Disability Review 15 (1): 51-55.

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2009) Callous/unemotional conduct disorder as a learning disability. Tizard Learning Disability Review 14 (4):40-46

Mackenzie R and Watts J (2009) The Autism Bill 2008/2009: implications for children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their families, carers and professionals, and the need to differentiate between differences and disabilities. Tizard Learning Disability Review 14 (3):33-37.

Watts J (2007) Looking Back Looking Forward. BMJ Career Focus 335: 228-9.

Watts J and Soppitt R (2007) Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: dispelling the myths. SEN The Journal for Special Needs Mar/Apr 27: 26-29.

Watts J (2006) John Watts’ Clinical Collective Nouns BMJ Career Focus 333: 241.

Watts J. (2005) Sports utility vehicles and older pedestrians: Not all SUVs are the same. BMJ 331: 967.

Nott MR and Watts JS (1999) A fractured hip during electro-convulsive therapy. European Journal of Anaesthesiology. Apr; 16(4):265-7.

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